Rothar Routes

Cycle routes & pilgrim journeys in Ireland and Europe …..

Posts tagged ‘South Leinster Cycle Routes’

Goresbridge to Graiguenamanagh

One of the most beautiful off road cycle – hiking routes in Ireland!

Last night was just an amazing evening to spend a few hours on the Barrow Track. I’ve added the drone footage above and a few photos to this post I previously wrote some years ago about this stretch of the river.

 

Ballykeenan Lock

Hanging Gardens Of Graiguenamanagh

Hanging Gardens Of Graiguenamanagh

Ballingrane

Ballykeenan Lock

Ballykeenan Lock

River Barrow and Brandon Hill

Pave it or Save it?

It’s only 30 kms from Goresbridge to Graiguenamangh, return journey, along the banks of the Barrow but it takes a lot longer than expected as there is so much to see!
The river wanders between steep wooded hillsides of ancient oak, ash, scots pine and conifer on its path to the sea.
It seems to have its own micro climate. Lush and green.

And it’s only by walking it or cycling it that one can truly appreciate why there is such controversy about paving this most wonderful natural walkng / cycling route.

My favourite section to cycle, the grassy towpath is smooth underneath apart from the odd disturbance where the roots of trees protrude and progress would be swift if it were not for the constant stopping and starting to marvel at the stunning scenery or to ponder the many historical sites along the way. The hurlers of Mt Leinster Rangers favour this section too for their pre season fitness training!

There are 6 locks on this section of the river – Lower Ballyellin, Ballytiglea, Borris, Ballingrane, Clashganny and Ballykeenan. In times past the lock keepers lived alongside in the adjoining cottages; some are now used as pretty holiday homes. If there are locks there are weirs and the trip southwards is often accompanied to the sound of water cascading over them, the only sound to be heard.
The river is dotted with some massive rocks in this section which are more visible than usual thanks to the dry summer we have had. Elusive herons favour them as isolated perches to rest upon.


Ballytiglea Bridge has five arches and is the access point from Borris to the Track. It is one of the most used access points and you are almost certain to bump in to local fishermen, walkers or swimmers once you pass under the arch. Yesterday I met one lady, who I often meet, that favours a spot about 500 meters south of the bridge for a daily swim.
Borris house is close by but its view is obscured by the dense cover of oak and ash trees on the estate. The ancestral home of the McMurrough Kavanagh clan was established in Brehon times and is still occupied by the Kavanagh family. It is one of the few Irish estates that can trace its history back to the royal families of ancient Ireland. The house and Borris village are worthy of a visit in their own right.


A humped back bridge spans the Mountain River which borders the estate is one of my favourite stopping points; it’s a quiet spot and entertainment today was provided by playful otters and lightning fast kingfishers who are just a blur of blue as they fly past at incredible speed just above the water line.
The last day down here I took a photo or a boat wreck and jokingly referred to Jack Sparrow. Today I sheltered during a rain shower under a canopy of trees closer to Ballingrane Lock where an unfortunate sparrow must have mistaken the reflection in the water as being the sky and crashed in and shuddered to a halt. The poor thing flapped furiously but hadn’t the strength to emerge and quickly drowned and floated away.

Island at Ballykeenan Lock

For the second successive trip I came across people camping on the river bank, this time beside the ruin of the lock cottage. A lovely secluded place to pitch tent.
The iconic photograph of the Barrow is taken from above Clashganny Lock and shows the lock, lock house and the weir from above the tree line of the steeply banked sides of the river. Its one of the few spots on any river where a lifeguard is employed doing the summer months such is its popularity with swimmers. It’s a great spot for canoeing too and Charlie Horan’ of Go With The Flow, has really helped promote use of the river and an appreciation of its history and beauty to holidaymakers and day trippers alike.

Have to say i was chuffed to pass two ladies and one of them to call after me ‘ are you the fella wrote the book?! I had to stop and chat and I was delighted with the reaction to ‘Cycling South Leinster, Great Road Routes’.
Shortly after Clash is the only double lock on the Barrow navigation, Ballykeenan. Behind the island at Ballykeenan Lock is a unique historical link with the rivers past. The monks of Duiske Abbey prized the salmon and eel fisheries of the Barrow and they created eel fisheries on the river in the 13th century. They are still visible 800 years later. Worth seeing!
Its a short spin down to Graigue from here and the surface is good and the scenery spectacular.

Eel Fishery Ballykeenan

Graigue is another great village along the river to visit and explore. But I had to retrace my way to Goresbridge and photograph a few more interesting places!

Approaching Graiguenamanagh

The Barrow between Lower Ballyellin and Ballytiglea

I particularly like the section of the Barrow Way from the Lower Ballyellin Cut to Ballytiglea Bridge. This section has a really good level grass surface, although I notice Waterways ireland ‘maintenance works’ have begun to provide a ‘washerboard’ effect on what was a pristine surface for walking and cycling…. The river meanders through fertile farm land and some lovely wooded sections.

There are a number of weirs and there are lots of herons and cormorants nesting in this area and there is a great isolated perch mid river on a huge granite boulder.

Its a great place to do a 10km walk, starting in Goresbridge as far as Ballytiglea bridge and back along a very quiet section of the river.

Ballytiglea Lock Gates and the River Barrow

Ballytiglea

Lower Ballyellin

Brandon Hill

Towering over the River Barrow and the town of Graiguenamangh, Brandon Hill offers spectacular views of the Barrow Valley, the Blackstairs and as far south as the Saltee Islands and west to Sliabh na mBan. Often as i cycled alongside the river I had the notion to climb Brandon for the view down into St Mullins. Lat night I went one better and cycled most of the way to the top and pushed the bike over the last few hundred metres. It was worth it! Here is a little clip of the cycle.

How Can I Protect You In This Crazy World?

Basking in May sunshine, The Barrow Way can be seen in all it’s glory; this is no Theme Park, it’s nature at it’s finest. Appreciated by all who use it for it’s beauty and tranquility, it is a real national treasure. We are not endowed with vast areas of wilderness so this sliver of green along the Banks of The Barrow must be retained. It is Carlow’s number one natural attraction and must be protected.

Get out and enjoy it; there are so many sections to ramble along on a summers evening or on a lazy weekend beside a lazy river…..

Christy Dignam’s lyrics say it best…. ‘How Can I Protect You In This Crazy World’?

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Couldn’t resist going down south again this afternoon. Here is Clashganny to St Mullins but at 20 x speed!

The Faerie Queen

Saved.

The Three Sisters

‘….three great rivers ran,
And many countries scowrd.

The first, the gentle Shure that making way
by sweet Clonmell, adorns rich Waterford:
The next, the stubborn Newre, whoe waters gray,
by faire Kilkenny and Rosseponte boord,
the third, the goodly Barow, which doth hoorde
Great heaps of Salmons in his deepe bosome:
All which long sundred, doe at last accord
To ioyne in one, ere to the sea they come,
So flowing all from one, all one at last become”.

The Faeire Queen by Edmound Spense

 

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