Rothar Routes

Cycle routes & pilgrim journeys in Ireland and Europe …..

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The Barrow between Lower Ballyellin and Ballytiglea

I particularly like the section of the Barrow Way from the Lower Ballyellin Cut to Ballytiglea Bridge. This section has a really good level grass surface, although I notice Waterways ireland ‘maintenance works’ have begun to provide a ‘washerboard’ effect on what was a pristine surface for walking and cycling…. The river meanders through fertile farm land and some lovely wooded sections.

There are a number of weirs and there are lots of herons and cormorants nesting in this area and there is a great isolated perch mid river on a huge granite boulder.

Its a great place to do a 10km walk, starting in Goresbridge as far as Ballytiglea bridge and back along a very quiet section of the river.

Ballytiglea Lock Gates and the River Barrow

Ballytiglea

Lower Ballyellin

Wanderings in South Carlow

South Carlow is such a magical place. Off the beaten track, there’s no fear of being over run by tourist ┬ábuses and that adds to its many charms. Its authentic and its ours!

We went for a wander on the Bank Holiday Monday and had the pleasant surprise of bumping in Deborah Adelman and her partner Jim on the Borris Viaduct. Deborah is currently based in Carlow College with International Students and Mary and Deborah recently became acquainted.

Took them under a wing and had a great afternoon looking at some interest places off the beaten track.

Rathgeran

Searching for Rock Art at Rathgeran

Rathgeran Rock Art

Rathgeran Rock Art

St Patricks Weekend and even the rocks are wearing green!

St Patricks Weekend and even the rocks are wearing green!

Hairy Tree at Borris Viaduct Walkway

Hairy Tree at Borris Viaduct Walkway

Borris Viaduct 2

Borris Viaduct

Borris Viaduct

Borris Viaduct

Borris Viaduct 3

Birds eye view of the Viaduct

Exploring St Mullins

Exploring St Mullins

Carlow’s ‘Boyne Valley’ Revisited!

I love getting a Saturday afternoon to explore a bit of our historic and fascinating county. Today I went down South – again to the Rathanna, Ballymurphy area.

A phone call from Eamon Coleman a couple of months ago to tell me that he had cleared a path to the ancient rock art and holy water wells that are situated on his land had me planning to head down when football commitments allowed.

First port of call was Killoughternane

This single cell Church was built in the 5th Century by St Fortchern. There is a well across the road that has a really interesting history. It was forgotten about until 1880 when the land owner found a bottle with a message inside, written in a foreign language which when translated contained directions to the well! It must have attracted visitors from continental Europe at some point. This obviously created great excitement and the Well became a pilgrimage site with may cures attributed.

Subsequently a lady was cleaning out the well when she unearthed a mud encrusted item from the bottom of the well. It turned out to be a Chalice and Paten – probably hidden in penal times. The Chalice is now in St Andrews Church, Bagenalstown.

 

Headed over to Tinnecarrig Ballymurphy then to meet Eamon Coleman and view the rock art that is well hidden from view in an ancient overgrown graveyard on his land.

Its hard to make out the cups on this stone but if you look carefully you can see many deep cups peppered all over the surface. What did they signify? Who knows at this stage but its great see that rock art many thousands of years old is still present across the county.

Indeed you could say that this area is the Boyne Valley of the South as there are numerous examples close to the foothills of the Blackstairs!

One of the Holy Wells well hidden from view.

Holy wells or water fonts….

Time to head home but a short dash across to Rathgeran and Carlow’s finest example of rock art beckoned.

There are many more ancient heritage sites in this small area of the County – I often think we undersell what we have to offer…

 

Rathgeran

2018 Out and About Carlow

Another year over and another year older! Just a short post wishing a Happy New Year to my Blog readers!

2018 was a busy year and I only managed about 1,500kms on the back roads and off road around the county, cycling and sometimes on foot. Here’s some of the things I saw along the way in our grand little county…

The Green Fields of France

I never gave much thought to the First World War. Sure I learned about it in history class but our interest in history would have been Irish history and while we did cover WW1 I don’t remember talking very much about the loss of life suffered by the thousands of Irish men who fought in The Great War.They fought for a variety of reasons – many fought to put food on the kitchen table, others for the promise of Home Rule yet others fought for the Crown and ‘the freedom of small nations’. I guess we were ambivalent about it at best. Yet almost 50,000 Irishmen lost their lives in the most inhumane conditions imaginable.

In 2010 I was fortunate, along with my youngest son Ronan, to have the opportunity to cycle from Canterbury to Rome along an ancient pilgrimage route, The Via Francigena. That was an amazing experience in so many different ways but perhaps the most unexpected was that it brought WW1 right into the present day for both of us. Our planning hadn’t factored in that we would be cycling through areas of France that were in the front line of battle. It was a shock to the system to suddenly come across, on Monday 6th September, small beautifully kept cemeteries along the 60kms of backroads of France between Arras and Peronne.

We stopped and paid our respects at each little graveyard and it was one of the most emotional places and moving things I have ever done. It really brought home the futility of war to walk among row after row of identical white memorial headstones and read the ages of these teenage soldiers who all died in vain, for the nations of Europe were to repeat those mistakes again and again.

I’ve edited out a little video clip at the end of this blog post of our visit to one of the cemeteries as a gesture of remembrance for all the dead on both sides and the civilians who were caught up in this most brutal conflict.

It was lovely to see how well maintained all the cemeteries were.

This post is to mark the one hundred anniversary of Armistice Day and to help us not forget.

Allied War memorial between Arras and Peronne

Respectfully maintained WW1 cemeteries are to be found on the back roads of France. There are many more than the more well known major memorials and serve as a reminder of the futility of war.

Hindu Soldiers honoured

Four years later I was back in France and cycling in the Lyon area and I went astray taking what turned out to be a very long shortcut! But it was very interesting and I came across a WW2 graveyard as poignant as coming across the WW1 graveyards in 2010. But this was even more surprising for this was a cemetery for almost 20,000 German soldiers at a place called Dagneux.

Dangeux WW2

The war graces site at Dagneux was developed by the German War Graves Commission with the permission of the French Authorities during the 1950s and 1960s.

 

Dagneux

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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